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IABC Heritage Chapter Regional Conference

Two weeks ago I attended the IABC Heritage Chapter’s Regional Conference in Indianapolis. This is my sixth year as an IABC member, but there is no chapter in Buffalo, so I applied for a scholarship to attend and share some key learnings through my blog. It was a session-packed two-day conference with about 150 attendees, mostly from the Midwest and New England chapters. It was great to see IABC student chapters from Ithaca College and Indiana State. I joined the Heritage Region, which covers 11 states, as an at-large member. I attended the 2009 IABC International Conference in San Francisco and the 2012 IABC Leadership Institute for chapter board members in Miami, but this was my first regional conference.

The organizers did a great job planning the agenda, which featured an excellent opening reception and Butler University social media presentation at the NCAA’s headquarters in downtown Indy. It was also a great convenience that all of the conference presentation decks were distributed via a Google docs link in the days leading up to the conference. This is especially helpful when you can’t attend all concurrent sessions, of course, but would like to peruse the materials of the ones you missed at some point.

Generally, when I attend workshops, panels, presentations and conferences, I will compile what I call a “synthesized summary” of highlights. In this spirit, I have digested several of the presentations into the list of takeaways.

1.The new IABC career continuum categories are “Foundational,” “Specialist,” “Strategic Advisor” and “Business Leader.”

2. Tim McCleary from The Involvement Practice provided an interactive opening keynote session called “What’s Your It?” that covered ways to involve employees better, outlining the methodology of “Understand It” (What is the change or opportunity?), “Own It” (Why is the change occurring?) and “Activate It” (“How will you make the change happen?).

3. Management change initiatives follow two avenues – The Escalator Effect – Employees can’t keep up with the constant management changes just as an escalator rail is always slightly ahead of the tread’s pace; and the Pancake Effect, where change programs keeping stacking on top of each other like flap jacks.

4. Where there is dialogue, employees will remember 50 percent of management communications; where there is immersion, there is 75 percent retention; and where there is true involvement, engagement rises to 90 percent.

5. Linda Dulye provided survey results that indicated employee engagement remains the top workplace challenge for communications with customer satisfaction the second greatest factor. She also noted that strategic planning and personal development are the top priorities of communications leaders.

6. Dulye’s 4R model for effective communication entails “Relay” (channel choice), “Relate” (customize information), “Receive” (active listening) and “Respond” (verify and follow up).

7. The 3V leader model – Seeing, influence and believing: 50% of communication is visual, 50 percent is vocal and 10 percent is verbal.

8. The SOCIAL acronym stands for Strategy, Objective/Obstacle, Content/Channels, Integration, Action Plan and Learnings.

9. 360-degree reviews and assessments can identify the “Say/Do” gaps in leadership communication. Leader behaviors and communications audits should include these questions: How they use their time? What are they leading? What questions do they ask employees?

10. Change awareness comes from formal communication (15%), processes/experience (30%) and leadership (55%).

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