MBA Primer ~ Part VII: Patiently Chart Your Course

[This is the final post from my seven-part MBA overview series. To see the previous six posts, see the MBA Summary Category in the right column].

After you have completed the MBA program, you will have arrived at a juncture in your career primed, eager and feeling ready for significant advancement. You will take pride in your achievement for a while and exude optimism knowing you will represent a versatile asset for your employer or the next one. You have to think this way and be positive when faced with a challenging hiring environment.

You don’t want to get frustrated if time elapses with no new big opportunity calling your name. For evening program graduates, even if you remain in the same position for some time after graduating, it is essential to approach your role with a new sense of leadership, creativity, thoroughness and vision in how you can bring added value to your department and organization.

It is important for your confidence to embrace new possibilities in your position even if you seek other senior positions elsewhere. You want to avoid falling into the pessimistic perspective that earning the MBA hasn’t paid off for you. Even if you feel it isn’t in a direct, immediately measurable fashion, it is helping you and it will pay off in sustaining a career for many years. Just don’t worry about what other MBAs may be achieving and figure out how you can carve your path with the additional education that you proudly pursued.

If your post-MBA job is the same as pre-MBA, consider investigating other avenues to demonstrate your varied skills and leadership experience such as volunteering for a board position on any of the vast array of organizations in the professional, cultural or community services sectors. These can be intrinsically rewarding opportunities that can foster new working relationships, contribute to the augmenting of other professional skills and further shape your managerial mindset.

Other areas to step away from your routine could include mentoring college students in your field or offering to speak at some university classes or local business organizations. These are the kinds of experiences that bolster any C.V. and improve confidence and presentation acumen regardless of one’s expertise or industry.

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