Upcoming Events in Western New York

WordCamp Buffalo  – Sept. 13

Buffalo Niagara Kickoff – Sept. 18

PRSA Northeast District Conference in Rochester - Sept. 18-19

PRSA Buffalo Continuing Education breakfast panel - Sept. 24 (details coming soon)

Buffale Sales & Marketing CEO Roundtable – Sept. 29

Visit Buffalo Niagara Social Media Tourism Summit - Oct. 1

PRSA Buffalo Happy Hour at Resurgence Brewery - Oct. 9

TEDx Buffalo – Oct. 14

Startup Weekend Buffalo – Oct 24-26

Anything Noteworthy About Your Note-Taking Process?

When you attend meetings with co-workers, vendors or clients, how do you capture the highlights, takeaways and action items? What is your signature process that works for you so you don’t forget to do something for your boss, colleague or [potential] client?

I tend to be very project-oriented and make checklists all the time. I occasionally wonder what other methods public relations adhere to in staying ulta-organized and keep everything together – the strategy, the needed tactics and all the logistical minutiae that can come with project management, delegation, execution and evaluation.

What are the core purposes of taking notes? I think we can mostly agree that the reasons generally fall into the following four areas:

  1. Stay engaged in the proceedings while participating in the dialogue
  2. Capture what needs to be done down the road by you and others
  3. Deliver meeting minutes to participating parties to abide by reason #2.
  4. If none of the above three principles apply directly, then it may come down to a simple matter of appearing officious or productive for a little showmanship

Some people like to use a portfolio folder or a journal with personal or artistic flair. Whatever works for you, right? Generally, I prefer the classic black portfolio notepad when venturing out of the office for professional association luncheons, seminars and conferences.

A few years ago. I embraced a new method for my scribbling madness. I was in Barnes and Noble when I stumbled upon the stationery section and found to my delight a extra-large, hard-cover sketch book without lines. I was hooked! I’m not really sure why, but I was drawn to a pad without lines. Perhaps this is because my handwriting is rather erratic, some would say poor, and I could get away with not staying within the arbitrarily-set boundaries of a notepad manufacturer.

The giant sketchpad book worked great for the most part. I took it to every meeting and each page was clearly dated in the upper-left corner, so there was no danger of action items getting lost or out of sequence from when they were discussed.

After two years with the sketch pad, I lost the interest and went back to boring office-issued note pads just because they were easy to grab from the office suply room. Now I resort to recording highlights of meetings in the right column on the agendas. Clearly, this works well whenever agendas are provided, so instead of my handy comprehensive sketchbook filled with notes, projects to experiment with and regular assignments, I was left with a growing stack of lists that could fall out of order.

If checklists are our efficient, mostly concise way of tracking accomplishments and matching them back with the original setting of the goals, then meeting notes are the functional necessities and the projects to ponder that keep you motivated to bring everything together and keep your process productive as you go about tackling all of the daily to-do lists.

Whatever note-taking process works well to keep you organized, keep at it, or take a step back and try a new format or style. Some might think my notes are actually a brand of reporter short-hand, but alas, no, that is my normal script!